34.0618°N
118.3006°W

'HERE' IS A COLLECTION OF
LOCAL INSIGHTS TO COMPLEMENT
A STAY AT THE LINE LOS ANGELES

The Line was created by a team of collaborators led by the Sydell Group.  ¶  Sydell is an owner, developer and manager of hotels. ¶ For each of its projects Sydell acts as curator – throwing location-specific inspiration and some of the world’s best creative minds at a hotel until it becomes a unique thing that resonates with the people and place surrounding it. The Line is the most direct expression of Sydell’s collaborative philosophy and an evolution from its previous projects. The original Sydell collaboration – The Ace New York – launched in 2009 and was followed by The Ace Palm Springs, the Saguaro Hotels in Palm Springs and Scottsdale, The Nomad Hotel in New York and, most recently, The Freehand in Miami.

EVERY PERSON 
WHO COMES HERE LEAVES A TINY 
BIT DIFFERENT

CONSUME

Koreatown is excess town. The chance of overdoing it - over-indulging, over-eating, over-enjoying - is higher in Koreatown than possibly anywhere else in the city of extravagance that is Los Angeles. Being able to hobble home from Kobawoo House without needing a car or cab is a blessing that may well lead to further drinking and eating as you pass not-to-be-missed bars and restaurants on every corner.  ¶   Food worth driving for also exists, of course, so catch a Lyft car ride to Din Thai Fung dumpling house in Arcadia. Here you’ve got an array of sumptuous options but do not ignore the juicy pork dumplings that will sustain your return to K-Town. It’s not all fancy pork dumplings though, there’s also bacon-wrapped hotdogs available from food carts on almost every corner – DO NOT SHUN THIS LOCAL DELICACY. ¶  And in keeping with our literal take on consumerism we simply must direct you to Koreatown’s Beerbelly: purveyor of possibly-maybe-definitely the world’s best grilled-cheese sandwich. They also have beer, because you know… beer!

JUST A FEW OF OUR FAVORITE PLACES AROUND KOREATOWN. FROM A KOREAN TEAHOUSE TO MODERN MEXICAN — WE'RE CONFIDENT YOU WON'T GO HUNGRY.

GUYS IN STUDDED LEATHER JACKETS HAPPILY CHAT 
TO AGING WAR VETERANS

NIGHT

A good night out begins with a simple question: do you feel more like (A) Korean food or (B) Mexican food? For option A visit Kobawoo House and for B, visit Guelaguetza - a favourite of Vampire Weekend (sorry to name-drop). Then it’s a quick tumble through the following venues in no particular order: R Bar, The Brass Monkey and Bobby London.  ¶  Still got time? Good! LA is alive with music and art – check the programs of the Wiltern Theatre, The Rose Bowl, The Bootleg Theatre and Echoplex and go get some live music in your ears. To keep it local, head to Airliner on a Wednesday night for Low End Theory DJs – why? Because Thom Yorke says so, that’s why. ¶  Drink some excellent cocktails at The Varnish and dance to really good soul and funk at Monty Bar, rounding out the night by heading back to Koreatown and trying to talk your way into an ‘after-hours’ – just follow the crowds of drunk people.

KOREATOWN’S RESIDENTS WORK HARD, BUT THAT NEVER STOPS THEM PLAYING HARD ONCE THE SUN SETS. SWIPE FOR SOME SUGGESTIONS OF VENUES TO HELP YOU TURN AN EVENING DRINK INTO AN EARLY MORNING DANCE.

LA’S SUPER-HIGHWAYS 
AND SPREAD-OUT MULTIPLE CITY CENTERS WERE BUILT AS “AN ANTIDOTE 
TO PLACES LIKE NEW YORK CITY”

LA BY DESIGN

The story of Los Angeles, which has forever been known as the city of the future, can be read in its architecture. LA is different to any other city in the world – not just because of its population of eccentrics, but because it was deliberately designed to be different. “Its vastness and its multiple centres for activity and engagement are all part of the plan,” says Getty Research Institute curator of architecture and design Christopher Alexander. “From its earliest days – from native American settlement – it’s always been what’s called a polycentric city.”  ¶  Seek the quintessential LA via The Wayfarer Chapel designed by Lloyd Wright, son of Frank. Find Pann’s Diner for a perfect example of idiosyncratic Googie architecture (and excellent chicken and waffles) and visit Downtown LA’s Department of Power and Water building designed by AC Martin in the ‘60s. It’s not all bricks and mortar though, design in LA can be as shiny and substantial as Apple or as low-fi and ephemeral as Sean Knibb's philosophies on environmental design.

IN THE CITY OF FUTURE SEE GREAT BUILDINGS FROM THE PAST. EACH MONUMENT TELLS A LITTLE OF THE STORY OF LOS ANGELES.

I WAS LIKE ‘YEAH, WHY NOT – I’LL JUST MOVE TO LA AND START FROM SCRATCH’.”

EXPLORE

We trust you’re already in explorer mode. You can eat your way through Koreatown. You can drink your way, shop your way, drive, bike, sail and fly. The rule to exploring K-Town and surrounds has to be to follow your instinct and then totally disregard it. With only a short time to spend in Los Angeles’ densest and most diverse neighborhoods you are going to have to launch a concentrated attack and focus on the essentials – eating, drinking and public nudity.  ¶  Head straight to a bowl of Korean porridge at the 24-hour Mountain Café. Next thing: ditch your clothes of among a whole bunch of strangers and experience a little Korean tradition at Grand Spa where the prices for day spa treatments are unbelievably cheap and the masseuses all have at least ten years experience.  ¶  Sure, you may feel like napping post rub down but there's too much going on in LA for sleeping. From gallery openings featuring the work of emerging artists along Culver City's  La Cienega Boulevard, to high-end, internationally-renowned exhibits at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) or artistry of a different kind in Killspencer's handmade baggage - it's all worth getting across, so step to it.

LOS ANGELES CRAGGY OUTCROPS FORM THE BACKDROP AGAINST WHICH SOME OF THE COUNTRY’S BEST ART – BE IT MUSIC, VISUAL OR PERFORMANCE – IS MADE. SWIPE IMAGES TO EXPLORE.

Creative Director — Adam Johnson @ Xtra Shiny

Editor — Farrin Foster

Sub-editors — Owen Lindsay and Suzie Keen

Content supervisor — Joshua Fanning

Photographer — Andrè Castellucci

 

Contributing photographer — Travis Jensen

Illustration — Wayne Johnson

Thanks to — Anna Duer, Eric Hsu, David Irvin,

Ross McHenry, Benjamin Chi and Jarrad Van Dijk

Publisher — Tanner Campbell @ Sydell Group